THE BROTHERS - NICO and SAM

Nico is one of the two Scamperats who was rescued from a starving artist’s colony. He and his brother Sam literally arrived at our door amid a basketful of ratties one Labor Day weekend, carried in by a starving artist, whose avocation is rescuing ratties. Nico is a black and white buck splotchy hoodie, meaning his face and body (to his forelegs) are hooded in black, but rather than the show standard of an even-width black stripe from his hood to his tail - he has an oval “splotch” of black on his back like a saddle. (Yes there are “shows” for Fancy Rats, with color standards and markings.) Nico, like is brother, Sam, is a more avant garde artist. He himself is a bit avant garde, sporting his splotchy saddle black pattern. A product of his starving artist days, Nico became very much of a street scrapper and “tough guy”. This led to some problems at the Scamperat Art Colony in that the genteel and gentlemanly Victor Creamsicle and Coco Bean found themselves in uncomfortable, street fighting situations. After several trips to the ER, the problem was solved by giving Nico his own separate quarters. Nico’s work is very reminiscent of artists such as Vincent rat Gogh. His art exhibits many of the same disturbing qualities as rat Gogh, together with similar streaks of brilliance.

Sam is the other one of the two Scamperats who was rescued from the starving artist’s colony. Sam is a grey and white buck hoodie, meaning his face and body (to his forelegs) are hooded in grey, and he has an oval saddle of grey on his back. Sam, like his brother, Nico, is a more contemporary ratiste. Until he involuntarily became a eunuch, Sam was very much a thug and tough guy. He’s become a much more mellow ratiste since then, focusing instead on creation instead of destruction. Sam’s work is very reminiscent of artists such as Ratisse and Salvador Rati. His art exemplifies liberation through color and form.

 

RATKU

Nico, rescue rat
Biting, fighting with the boys
Yet so sweet to me

Sam, rescue tough guy
Sending the boys to the vet
Now you've no goolies

 

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